Printing: A bull in the current market

The stock market is not the only thing that’s up nowadays. Optimism among financial and strategic buyers of print business is bullish as well. The current business scenario shows that the printing business has earned the confidence and investors both strategic and private equity are frothing at the mouth to venture into new and novel growth opportunities. The industry is niche, efficient and profitable along with an avid growth and learning curve. It’s a “world is your oyster” moment for the emerging printing businesses and entrepreneurs.

Having said that, the printing business is indeed going through a make-shift turnover and it is necessary to embrace these changes in order to embrace growth. Following points give a holistic view covering most of the recent trends in this disruptive field

It’s getting more personal than ever 

“Personalisation” and “customisation” are currently the magic words that are being whispered in the printing industry. Gone are those days when these two words were mere terminologies used in CRM (Customer Relationship Management) in hospitality and services sector industry. The market for personalised print is growing leap and bounds and is hardly showing any signs of dormancy. In fact the customisation craze is not craze at all but rather a morsel that people will continue to want their print, their way. The demand for personalisation is ever increasing that requires faster, higher quality and more affordable print technology. The crux of the customisation uprising has to be sugared and seasoned with a fast, flexible and affordable technology

 

It’s my (printer’s) life and it’s now or never 

The projections could not have been clearer: In 2018, currently digital printing is playing Midas touch in supporting a printer’s growth. Going digital means embracing cost effectiveness over a longer run. In a short span of time it is going to gain more market value. The offset processes continue to see a decline in market share while digital printing escalates to gain more market value. In an industry that’s resistant to change, the rise of digital isn’t something printers can afford to ignore any longer.

 

Research: The magic wand to open new avenues for the printers 

As printers look to embrace digital solutions in order to enter new markets, they need to do their own R&D. Using the parameters, speed, quality and vibrancy as a guide, printers deliver rapid presses that offer quick turns, print quality of 1,200 dpi or higher, and novel ink formulas that meet the needs of their specific market.

With more and more printers creating customised and hybrid press solutions, they also consider retrofitting existing flex presses with digital capabilities. These hybrid presses bring new life to existing equipment and create a unique experience all together enabling a successful transitional process. But for this a considerable amount of R&D and survey has to be done and firms should not digress from this investment. After all Warren Buffet said, “be proud of your investments, not your profits”. Finding the bull’s eye and then investing on it is a task that the printing sector has to indulge itself in. Lastly, printers should seek digital press solutions that offer the best output at a low total cost of ownership that will enable not only rapid printing, but also a rapid return on investment. This also includes involving the OEMs (Original Equipment Manufacturers) in the decision making process and establishing a win-win situation for all.

In the end, it’s not about having a larger share of the pie but increasing the overall size of the pie altogether.

In a world where printing(3D) is disrupting every sector by creating functional body organs ready for surgery, buildings, vehicles and basically everything that tri-dimensional, 2D printing has also gone through a rapid transformation as the end products are shifting from assembly line mindset to more personalised one. Printing industry is certainly going to see the best days ahead in a short span of time 

          “Printing is like a gun powder to the artillery called the human mind”